Natural Cures

Contents
  1. The Principles of Nature Cure
  2. Fasting-The Master Remedy
  3. Therapeutic Baths
  4. The Power of Earth
  5. The Value of Exercise
  6. Therapeutic Value of Massage
  7. Yoga Therapy
  8. Importance of Sleep
  9. Nutrition for Vigor and Vitality
  10. Miracles of Alkalizing Diet
  11. Vitamins and their Importance
  12. Cataract
  13. Minerals and Their Importance
  14. Secrets of Food Combining
  15. Health Promotion the Vegetarian Way
  16. Importance of Dietary Fibre
  17. Lecithin - An Amazing Youth Element
  18. Acne
  19. Alcoholism
  20. Allergies
  21. Anaemia
  22. Appendicitis
  23. Arteriosclerosis
  24. Arthritis
  25. Asthma
  26. Backache
  27. Bronchitis
  28. Cancer
  29. Colitis
  30. The Common Cold
  31. Conjunctivitis
  32. Constipation
  33. Dandruff
  34. Defective vision
  35. Depression
  36. Diabetes
  37. Diarrhoea
  38. Dysentery
  39. Eczema
  40. Epilepsy
  41. Falling of Hair
  42. Fatigue
  43. Gall-Bladder Disorders
  44. Gastritis
  45. Glaucoma
  46. Gout
  47. Headaches and Migraine
  48. Heart Disease
  49. High Blood Cholesterol
  50. High Blood Pressure
  51. Hydrocele
  52. Hypoglycemia
  53. Indigestion
  54. Influenza
  55. Insomnia
  56. Jaundice
  57. Kidney Stones
  58. Leucoderma
  59. Neuritis
  60. Nepthritis
  61. Obesity
  62. Peptic Ulcer
  63. Piles
  64. Premature Greying of Hair
  65. Prostate Disorders
  66. Psoriasis
  67. Pyorrhoea
  68. Rheumatism
  69. Sexual Impotence
  70. Sinusitis
  71. Stress
  72. Thinness
  73. Tonsillitis
  74. Tuberculosis
  75. Varicose Veins
  76. Venereal Diseases
  77. Menstrual Disorders
  78. Premenstrual Syndrome
  79. Menopausal Problems
  80. Childbirth the Natural Way
  81. Habitual Abortion
  82. Female Sterility
  83. Leucorrhoea
  84. Inflammation of the Uterus
  85. Prolapse of the Uterus
  86. Vaginitis
  87. Pruritus Vulvae
  88. Hysteria
  89. Nutrition for Vigor and Vitality
  90. Nutrition for Vigor and Vitality
  91. Nutrition for Vigor and Vitality
  92. Nutrition for Vigor and Vitality
  93. Nutrition for Vigor and Vitality
  94. Nutrition for Vigor and Vitality
  95. Nutrition for Vigor and Vitality
  96. Nutrition for Vigor and Vitality
  97. Nutrition for Vigor and Vitality
  98. Nutrition for Vigor and Vitality
  99. Nutrition for Vigor and Vitality
  100. Nutrition for Vigor and Vitality
  101. Nutrition for Vigor and Vitality
  102. Nutrition for Vigor and Vitality
Other things
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Wednesday, February 7, 2007
Appendicitis
Appendicitis is the most common of all serious intestinal disorders. It refers to an inflammation of the vermiform appendix. It presents itself in acute and chronic forms and affects both the sexes equally. This disease now accounts for about half the acute abdominal emergencies occurring between the ages of 10 to 30 . It is more frequent in developed countries than underdeveloped countries. The appendix is a small tube located at the end of the caecum, the first part of the large intestine. It is called vermiform appendix as it resembles a worm. It is usually eight to ten cm. long. Its structure is made of the same tough fibrous outer covering as protects the entire alimentary canal. There is a layer of muscular tissue under the outer covering and further a layer of lymphoid tissue. The function of the appendix, which is performed by this lymphoid tissue, is to neutralise the irritating waste material generated in the body or the organic poisons introduced through the skin or membranes.
Symptoms
Appendicitis usually begins with a sudden pain in the centre of the abdomen, which gradually shifts to the lower right side. The pain may be preceded by general discomfort in the abdomen, indigestion, diarrhoea or constipation. The patient usually has a mild fever varying from 100 o to 102 o F. Nausea is common, and the patient may vomit once or twice. The muscles of the right side of the abdomen become tense and rigid. The patient draws some comfort by drawing up the right leg. The pain increases on the right side on pressing the left side of the abdomen. Coughing and sneezing makes the pain worse. If the inflammation continues to increase, the appendix may rupture and discharge its pus into the abdominal cavity. This may result in a serious state known as peritonitis. The temperature rises and the patient becomes pale and cold. This condition may call for urgent operation. In the chronic state of appendicitis, the patient may suffer from recurrent pain in the right lower abdomen with constipation, loss of appetite and mild nausea.
Causes

Appendicitis is caused by a toxic bowel condition. An excessive amount of poisonous waste material is accumulated in the calcium. As a result, the appendix is irritated and over-worked and becomes inflammed. It is an attempt on the part of nature to localise and "burn up" the toxins. This condition is brought about by wrong feeding habits and enervation of the system. Inflammation of the bowel lining, due to the habitual use of apparent drugs, is a potent predisposing factor in the development of appendicitis. Further inflammation and infection comes from certain germs which are usually present in the intestinal tract.
Treatment

The patient should be put to bed immediately at the first symptoms of severe pain, vomiting and fever. Rest is of utmost importance in the treatment of this disease. The patient should resort to fasting which is the only real cure for appendicitis. Absolutely no food should be given. Nothing except water should enter the system. Low enemias, containing about one pint (1/2 litre) of warm water should be administered everyday for the first three days to cleanse the lower bowel. Hot compresses may be placed over the painful area several times daily. Abdominal packs, made of a strip of wet sheet covered by a dry flannel cloth bound tightly around the abdomen, should be applied continuously until all acute symptoms subside. When the acute symptoms subside by about the third day, the patient should be given a full enema containing about 1 1/2 litre of warm water and this should be repeated daily until the inflammation and pain have subsided. The patient can be given fruit juices from the third day onwards. This simple treatment sensibly applied will overcome an appendicitis attack.
After spending three days on fruit juices, the patient may adopt an all-fruit diet for a further four or five days. During this period, he should have three meals a day each meal of fresh juicy fruits. Thereafter, he should adopt a well-balanced diet based on three food groups namely, (i) seed, nuts and grains, (ii) vegetables and (iii) fruits. In case of chronic appendicitis, a short fast should be followed by a full milk diet for two or three weeks. In this regimen, a glass of milk should be taken every two hours from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. on the first day, a glass every hour and a half the next day and a glass every hour the third day. Then the quantity of milk should be gradually increased so as to take a glass every half an hour, if such a quantity can be tolerated comfortably. After the full milk diet, the patient should gradually embark upon a well- balanced diet, with emphasis on fresh fruits and green leafy vegetables. Certain vegetable juices, especially carrot juice, in combination with the juices of beets and cucumbers, have been found valuable in the treatment of appendicitis. Regular use of tea made from fenugreek seeds has also proved helpful in preventing the appendix from becoming a dumping ground for excess mucous and intestinal waste. The patient of appendicitis should adopt all measures to eradicate constipation., if it is habitual. Much relief can be obtained by the application of hot fomentation and abdominal packs every morning and night. An abdominal massage is also beneficial. Once the waste matter in the calcium has moved into the colon and thence eliminated, the irritation and inflammation in the appendix will subside and surgical removal of the appendix will not be necessary. The surgical operation should be resorted to only in rare cases, when the appendix has become abscessed.
posted by Ashley @ 1:37 AM  
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