Natural Cures

Contents
  1. The Principles of Nature Cure
  2. Fasting-The Master Remedy
  3. Therapeutic Baths
  4. The Power of Earth
  5. The Value of Exercise
  6. Therapeutic Value of Massage
  7. Yoga Therapy
  8. Importance of Sleep
  9. Nutrition for Vigor and Vitality
  10. Miracles of Alkalizing Diet
  11. Vitamins and their Importance
  12. Cataract
  13. Minerals and Their Importance
  14. Secrets of Food Combining
  15. Health Promotion the Vegetarian Way
  16. Importance of Dietary Fibre
  17. Lecithin - An Amazing Youth Element
  18. Acne
  19. Alcoholism
  20. Allergies
  21. Anaemia
  22. Appendicitis
  23. Arteriosclerosis
  24. Arthritis
  25. Asthma
  26. Backache
  27. Bronchitis
  28. Cancer
  29. Colitis
  30. The Common Cold
  31. Conjunctivitis
  32. Constipation
  33. Dandruff
  34. Defective vision
  35. Depression
  36. Diabetes
  37. Diarrhoea
  38. Dysentery
  39. Eczema
  40. Epilepsy
  41. Falling of Hair
  42. Fatigue
  43. Gall-Bladder Disorders
  44. Gastritis
  45. Glaucoma
  46. Gout
  47. Headaches and Migraine
  48. Heart Disease
  49. High Blood Cholesterol
  50. High Blood Pressure
  51. Hydrocele
  52. Hypoglycemia
  53. Indigestion
  54. Influenza
  55. Insomnia
  56. Jaundice
  57. Kidney Stones
  58. Leucoderma
  59. Neuritis
  60. Nepthritis
  61. Obesity
  62. Peptic Ulcer
  63. Piles
  64. Premature Greying of Hair
  65. Prostate Disorders
  66. Psoriasis
  67. Pyorrhoea
  68. Rheumatism
  69. Sexual Impotence
  70. Sinusitis
  71. Stress
  72. Thinness
  73. Tonsillitis
  74. Tuberculosis
  75. Varicose Veins
  76. Venereal Diseases
  77. Menstrual Disorders
  78. Premenstrual Syndrome
  79. Menopausal Problems
  80. Childbirth the Natural Way
  81. Habitual Abortion
  82. Female Sterility
  83. Leucorrhoea
  84. Inflammation of the Uterus
  85. Prolapse of the Uterus
  86. Vaginitis
  87. Pruritus Vulvae
  88. Hysteria
  89. Nutrition for Vigor and Vitality
  90. Nutrition for Vigor and Vitality
  91. Nutrition for Vigor and Vitality
  92. Nutrition for Vigor and Vitality
  93. Nutrition for Vigor and Vitality
  94. Nutrition for Vigor and Vitality
  95. Nutrition for Vigor and Vitality
  96. Nutrition for Vigor and Vitality
  97. Nutrition for Vigor and Vitality
  98. Nutrition for Vigor and Vitality
  99. Nutrition for Vigor and Vitality
  100. Nutrition for Vigor and Vitality
  101. Nutrition for Vigor and Vitality
  102. Nutrition for Vigor and Vitality
Other things
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Saturday, February 10, 2007
Stress
The term stress has been borrowed by biologists from engineering, where it implies an ability to withstand a defined amount of strain. Dr. Hans Selye, a great medical genius and noted world authority on stress, has described stress as " a state manifested by a specific syndrome which consists of all the non-specifically induced changes within a biological system. " The term implies any condition that harms the body or damages or causes the death of a few or many cells. The body immediately tries to repair the damaged cells but it can do so only if the diet is adequate, providing a generous supply of all the essential nutrients. If, however, rebuilding of cells is not able to keep pace with their destruction, the condition will result in disease. The most common disease associated with stress are heart disease, diabetes, headache and peptic ulcer. Other diseases resulting from stress are ulcerative colitis, chronic dyspepsia, asthma, psoriasis and sexual disorders. Reactions to stress are manifold. No one situation is stressful to all the people all the time. Some of the factors that can produce stress are children or the lack of them, the boss or the subordinate, the traffic ,the telephone or the lackof it, overwork or not enough to do, too much money or too little of it, making decision, a dull routine job, lack of authority and apprehensions about the future.


Symptoms


The body and the mind react to any stress factor. A large number of physical changes take place at the time of stress induced arousal. The brain and nervous system become intensely active, the pupils of the eye dilate, digestion slows down,muscles become tense, the heart starts pumping blood harder and faster, blood pressure increases , breathing become faster, hormones such as adrenalie are released into the system alongwith glucose from the liver and sweating starts. All these changes take place in a split second under the direction of the nervous system. If the stress factors are immediately removed, no harm accrues and all the changes are reversed.


Stress in its earlier and reversible stage leads to poor sleep, bad temper, continual grumbling, longer hours of work with less achievement, domestic conflict with spouse and children, repeated minor sickness, absenteeism and prolonged absence for each spell of sickness, accident proneness, feeling of frustration and persecution by colleagues and complaints of lack of cooperation and increase in alcoholic intake. It is essential that these symptoms are recognised early by the patients or their well-wishers and remedies measures taken to overcome them. If, however, stress is continuous or repeated frequently, a variety of symptoms appear such as dizziness, stiff muscles, headache, vision problems, breathing difficulties, asthma, allergies, palpitation, digestive disorders, blood sugar rregularities, backache, skin disorders, bowel disorders and sexual difficulties


Causes


Stress may be caused by a variety of factors both outside the body and within. External factors include loud noises, blinding lights, extreme heat or cold, x-rays and other forms of radiation, drugs, chemicals, bacterial and various toxic substances, pain and inadequate nutrition. The factors from within the body include feelings of hate, envy, fear or jealousy.


Treatment


In dealing with stress, the patient should completely change his life style. He should adopt an optimum diet which should be able to meet the nutritional demands of stress. Such diet should obviously be made of foods which, in combination , would supply all the essential nutrients. It has been found that a diet which contains liberal quantities of (i) seeds, nuts and grains, (ii) vegetables, and (iii) fruits would provide an adequate amount of allthe essential nutrients. Each of these food groups should roughly form the bulk of one of the three meals. These three basic health -building foods should be supplemented with certain special foods such as milk, vegetable oils and honey. There are many foods which are helpful in meeting the demands of stress and should be taken regularly by the patient. These are yogurt, blackstrap molasses, seeds, and sprouts.


Yogurt is rich in vitamin A, B complex and D. It relieves insomnia, migraine and cramps associated with menstruation. Blackstrap molasses, a by-product of sugar refining process, is rich in iron and B vitamins. It guards against anaemia and is good for heart diseases. Seeds such as alfalfa, sunflower, and pumpkin and sprouts are rich in calcium and quite effective as deterrents of listlessness and anxiety. Steam cooked vegetables are best as boiling causes many vitamins and minerals to be dispelled into the water. The leaves of holy basil, known as tulsi in the vernacular, are highly beneficially the treatment of stress. They are regarded as adaptogen or antistress agents. Recent studies have shown that the leaves protect against stress significantly. It has been suggested that even healthy persons should chew 12 leaves of basil twice a day, morning and evening for preventing stress. Certain nutrients are beneficial in relieving stress. These are vitamins A and B, minerals such as calcium, potassium and magnesium which reduce the feeling of irritability and anxiety. Vitamin A is found in green and yellow vegetables. Some of the valuable sources of vitamin B are cashews, green leafy vegetables, yeast, sprouts and bananas.


An element of vitamin B complex, pantothenic acid is especially important in preventing stress. It has a deep effect on the adrenal glands and the immune system and adequate amount of this vitamin along with vitamin A can help prevent many of the changes caused by stress. Potassium deficiencies are associated with breathlessness, fatigue, insomnia and low blood sugar. Potassium is essential for healthy heart muscles. Nuts and unrefined grains are good sources of potassium. Calcium is a natural sedative. Deficiencies can cause fatigue, nervousness and tension. Dairy products, eggs, almonds, and soyabeans are rich sources of calcium. Magnesium is known as nature’s tranquiliser and is associated with the prevention of heart attack. Deficiencices may lead to excitability, irritability, apprehension and emotional disorders. Magnesium is also necessary for absorption of calcium and potassium and is found in many fruits, vegetables, seeds, dates and prunes.


There are certain foods which are associated with stress and anxiety and should be scrupulously avoided by patients. These foods are caffeine and many soft drinks, which causes nervousness, irritability and palpitation ; salt which has been associated with heart diseases; cigarettes which cause tension, irritability and sleeplessness and which have been linked with cancer, and alcohol which depletes vitamins of B group consider essential for reducing stress. Regular physical exercise plays an important role in the fight against stress. Exercise not only keeps the body physically and mentally fit, it also provides recreation and mental relaxation. It is nature’s best tranquiliser.


One can jog, run, walk or play games, depending upon one’s liking. Walking is the simplest and safest exercise. One should take a brisk walk for 45 minutes or so daily. Yogic asanas, kriyas and simple pranayams , beneficial for maintenance of general health and mental relaxation, can serve as the best shock-absorbers against stress. These include asanas like pavanmuktasana, sarvagasana, halasana, ardhamatsyendrasana, bhujangasana, dhanurasana, yogamudra ,padmasana, trikonasana, kriyas like kunjal and jalneti andpranayamas such as kapal bhati, anuloma- viloam, sitali , sitkari and bhramari. Recreation and rest are equally important and patient should set a definite time for recreational activities. They should also take a holiday at regular intervals. And above all, they should simplify their lifestyles to eliminate unnecessary stress.
posted by Ashley @ 1:33 AM  
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